Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Depression, Anxiety and Stress Management London, UK.

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Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Denny Meyer

Swinburne University of Technology, Australia

Keynote: Evaluation of a program to reduce stress in the workplace using mixed methods
Stress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Denny Meyer photo
Biography:

Denny Meyer is a Professor in the School of Health Sciences at the Swinburne University of Technology. She is an Applied Statistician specialized in the area of Mental Health Research. Her areas of particular interest include suicide ideation, vision loss, stress and the analysis of data collected using online systems with high attrition rates. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has worked with research teams on numerous research grants and tenders.

Abstract:

Stress has been associated with poorer sleep quality, higher fatigue and lower productivity, providing employers with  anincentive to provide their employees with programs that build a more resilient workforce. This study provides an evaluation of such a program using mixed methods. The program is called the Global Challenge and is owned by a commercial company called Virgin Pulse. Qualitative and quantitative survey data was collected concurrently, with validation provided by baseline and post-program performance measures for stress, sleep quality and productivity. The large sample size (more than 18000 responses) allowed the use of text mining to provide context for when the program resulted in a recommendation to a friend and what participants would miss most about the program. It also allowed the use of conventional generalized linear models and more modern machine learning methods to identify the other factors, such as demographic characteristics and the program features most used and influenced the success of the program. The results provide an understanding of how and why this program can be successful, isolating the drivers for and detractors from success. Particular strengths of the analysis include the use of a mixed methods design, the triangulation of results using baseline and post-program measures to supplement survey responses, the use of sophisticated text mining (parsing, filtering and clustering) approaches, and the integration of the quantitative and qualitative components of the study using machine learning (decision trees, random forests and gradient boosting) approaches. The results will inform future developments of this and other programs designed to build resilience for handling stress.

Stress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Angela Neal-Barnett photo
Biography:

Angela Neal-Barnett is a Director at Program for Research on Anxiety Disorders among African Americans, Department of Psychology, Kent State University. She has completed her PhD from DePaul University (1988). She has research interest in anxiety disorders among African Americans. Her research focuses on children's fears, violence and children's anxiety and panic disorders among African Americans. She is also interested in skin color issues and African American women's physical and emotional health.

Abstract:

Introduction: Research has found that among American adolescents, Black girls are at highest risk for anxiety. Cultural risk factors associated with anxiety in this population include skin color, racial identity, racism and the acting White accusation. Sexism appears to exacerbate these variables as gender issues interact with race. Black adolescent girls incur more daily hassles or small day-to-day problems than their female peers. These hassles are associated with increased anxiety. In addition, black girls’ acceptance of multiple roles during adolescence is also associated with heightened anxiety.
 
Aim: In this presentation, the author will discuss the data on the levels of anxiety and perceived stress in a sample of American inner-city 7th and 8th grade Black girls. Results indicated that anxiety within this sample is higher than the expected norms and perceived stress is at a moderate level. Implications of the results for development and implementation of a culturally-infused intervention will be discussed.
 
Method: Participants were 86 Black/biracial seventh and eighth grade adolescent females between the ages of 12-15 enrolled in Sisters United Now, a stress and anxiety intervention program. Participants attended one of two middle schools located in a large mid-western, low-income, urban school district. All students within the district receive free breakfast and lunch. The study was approved by Kent State’s University IRB. Participants completed a variety of measures related to stress and anxiety: “The Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children” 2nd edition (MASC-2); the perceived stress scale (PSS), and the stress test. The stress test was developed specifically for the purposes of this study.
 
Results: Descriptive statistics of MASC-2 anxiety total T-score indicated the group had above average anxiety (M=58.3 σ=10.78). In the distribution of MASC-2 classifications (range very low to very high) nearly all participants (96.3%) were classified as average to very high anxiety, and nearly half of participants (48.1%) were classified as having elevated anxiety. Descriptive statistics of the PSS indicated participants had a moderate stress level (M=22 σ=7.15). A moderate positive correlation was found between PSS and MASC- 2 total T-score (r=0.237, p=0.034). The stress test indicated that participants’ top stressor was academics (N=41), family ((N=19) and relationships (N=15).
 
Discussion: Similar to existing research, the Black girls in this study reported elevated scores of anxiety. These findings indicate that participants are experiencing greater levels of stress and anxiety compared to their peers. Interestingly perceived stress and anxiety were moderately related possibly suggesting that these two factors are working independently in this sample. The findings highlight the importance for researchers to develop interventions to target this specific population. The purpose of such interventions should be to help these girls develop resiliency and strategies to cope and deal with stress and anxiety.

 

  • Workshop
Location: Waterfront 3

Session Introduction

Lucy Lila Nelson

Certified Life Coach & Yoga Teacher, USA

Title: Yoga-based Stress Management: Introducing Yogic Principles and Practices for Stress Relief
Speaker
Biography:

Lucy Lila Nelson is a Wellness Specialist and Workshop Facilitator with a wide variety of background and schooling. She is trained in various mind-body modalities such as a Yoga Teacher (Level I and II, Stress Management), Positive Psychology Practitioner and Life Coaching Skills, Interfaith Minister, certified in whole-food plant-based (WFPB) nutrition, Wellness Coach, Mindfulness-based Eating Awareness Educator (MB-EAT), Emotional Freedom Technique Practitioner (EFT), and Yoga Dancer.

Abstract:

Yoga, as we now know, has proven to demonstrate enormous benefits in many different spectrum and aspects of life. In the past 30 years, research in mind-body medicine has placed yoga as a leading approach to promoting greater balance and relieving stress. Many contributors to this work involves several researchers and physicians including but not limited to Dr. Dean Ornish, who adapted an Integral Yoga Hatha class (calling it stress management) as part of a lifestyle change program to reverse heart disease; Jon Kabat-Zin used hatha yoga as a mindfulness of movement practice at the Stress Reduction Clinic
of the University of Massachusetts Medical Centre; and Herbert Benson described “relaxation response” based on his study of transcendental meditation and other yoga techniques, eventually founding the Mind and Body Institute at Harvard Medical School. Th ere is a growing research that recognizes stress as an important health concern. Th ey continuously support the efforts to bringing awareness of the benefits of yoga in the medical community. Yoga fosters a renewed sense of the body and mind, developing the skills to transform our physical, mental and emotional responses. Th e yogic approach to stress management is an adaptation of the yoga practices and philosophy (such as Hatha and Raja yoga); making these tools accessible and relevant to people from different backgrounds in a variety of settings. Hatha yoga includes centering, stretching, breathing, and meditation, and Raja yoga includes developing self-awareness and using the power of the mind to manage change. It was concluded that a combined methodology is the most effective.

  • Anxiety Disorders | Depression Treatment | Suicide and Prevention | Stress Therapies | PTSD
Location: Waterfront 3

Session Introduction

Aboelezz Mahmoud Kalboush

Alnoor Specialist Hospital, Saudi Arabia

Title: Treatment of resistant depression: Have we missed the right track ?
Speaker
Biography:

Aboelezz Mahmoud Kalboush is a Consultant Psychiatrist; he received his Master’s degree in Psychiatry and Neurology from Ain-Shams University, Egypt in 2007. He is the Head of Psychiatry department in Alnoor Specialist Hospital, Saudi Arabia. He is responsible for training of medical students (both undergraduates and post-graduates) in Psychiatry.

Abstract:

Introduction: In 1950’s the clinical introduction of the fi rst two specifi cally anti-depressant drugs: iproniazid, a monoamineoxidase inhibitor and imipramine, the first tricyclic antidepressant started. Since that time up till now, many antidepressants working on different neurotransmitters and receptors linked to depression were discovered and introduced in clinical practice but the main advantage of them over the old ones is their higher tolerability by patients. Combining psychotherapy with pharmacological treatment can improve the success rate of treatment but a considerable portion of patients stay resistant to this combined treatment. Even with using electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) in treating resistant depression, up to 20% of patients don't respond to it. Th is means that there is still something missed in treating patients with resistant depression and something more is needed to treat resistant depression more effectively.

Speaker
Biography:

Belinda Neil is a Director at PTSD Australia New Zealand, former Police Inspector, an 18 year veteran of the New South Wales (Australia) Police Force (medically retiring with PTSD in 2005), Hostage Negotiator, and Keynote Speaker in both the corporate arena and in her role as a Mental Health Advocate. She is the author of the book “Under Siege”. Currently, she is working on various management tools to assist in early intervention and minimising the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Abstract:

One of the goals of therapy is to reduce symptoms and provide a better quality of life for the patient suffering post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, or depression. Post-traumatic stress disorder occurs after traumatic events exposure. PTSD is characterized by symptoms of re-experiencing such as intrusive memories and dreams: avoidance including avoiding thoughts, feelings and places associated with the traumatic event: numbing or feeling detached from others; and hyperarousal including poor sleep, irritability and hypervigilance. Th ere are now many studies that show a growing awareness that the cerebellum plays a higher role in cognitive functions such as sensory processing, attention, verbal working memory, and emotion. Recent studies have shown that the cerebellar fluid reduction is associated with mood, anxiety and PTSD symptoms and that there is a possible role of the cerebellum in the vulnerability to experience negative eff ect. Th is is the second study involving participants diagnosed with PTSD undertaking a novel physical exercise designed to stimulate cerebellar function. Those participants who regularly performed the exercise advised of a significant reduction in their PTSD symptoms. Th e participants advised of improved sleep, a positive change in themselves, a reduction in negative emotions, improvement in memory and a reduction in intrusive memories. Both studies clearly showed an overall improvement in participants. Besides providing the patient with improved quality of life, it is stated that the use of putative cerebellum exercises may assist the patient in early stages of treatment, not only with their concentration but more importantly allowing them to participate in CBT or exposure therapy
rather than dissociating.

Biography:

Andrew John Ashworth has graduated from Leeds University Medical School in 1980. He became a member of the Royal College of General Practitioners in 1985. He was a Royal Navy Medical Officer between 1980 and 19994 with experience including combat in the Falklands Conflict and in submarines at sea. He is dual qualified in Occupational Medicine. His special interest is in the treatment of Psychological Trauma and is qualified in Brainspotting as well as CBT. He works as an NHS General Practitioner in Scotland as well as providing occupational medical services and carrying out research on trauma and anxiety.

Abstract:

A method of rapid attenuation of symptoms of anxiety (including panic) is described using interoception combined with simultaneous stimulation of the third and fourth cranial nerves by the subject. Th e method is thought to interrupt a neurological feedback loop which will be described by direct stimulation of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus which is the rostralmost parasympathetic nucleus in the brainstem. Attenuation of interoceptive (physical) symptoms usually occurs in less than 5 minutes with associated elimination of psychological symptoms. Having learnt the method it can be carried out by the patient without further therapeutic intervention. Th e method has been used in a Scottish General Practice now for over 12 months with associated reduction in prescribing and referral numbers to mental health services. In an oral presentation, a demonstration with a volunteer can be carried out to demonstrate both the delivery of the method and to have feedback from the volunteer subject.

Speaker
Biography:

Asa Westrin is a Senior Consultant in Psychiatry in Southern Sweden. She is a University Lecturer and is an Associate Professor at Lund University. She is the Head of Clinical Psychiatric Research Center (VKP), Region Skåne. She is the Head of the Unit for Clinical Suicide Research, Lund University. She has published more than 35 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

There are reasons to believe that maladaptive coping strategies are related to brain areas fundamental to learning, memory, and thinking. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is located in these brain areas and has an important role in the regulation of neuroplasticity. We have observed an association between BDNF Val66Met gene polymorphism and avoidant coping strategies,
suggesting a genetic predisposition for vulnerability to stress in a subgroup of suicide attempters. Interestingly, we have also observed an association between low BDNF levels and high impulsiveness, a trait related to increased suicide risk. Furthermore, we have observed associations between low BDNF levels and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity in female suicide attempters. As the HPA-axis regulates different reactions to stress, for example mood and emotions, our results suggest that increased stress is associated with low BDNF levels in female suicide attempters. Another biomarker of interest
when studying stress and cellular damage is mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Animal studies have suggested that chronic stress causes cellular damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and possibly a release of mtDNA into the peripheral circulation. We have reported significantly increased levels of free-circulating mtDNA in suicide attempters compared to healthy controls and a significant correlation between mtDNA and cortisol after a dexamethasone challenge. Th is suggests an association between mitochondrial dysfunction and HPA-axis hyperactivity in suicide attempters. We conclude that further studies should explore subgroups of suicide attempters with maladaptive coping strategies and biomarkers of cellular damage, in order to find new strategies to recognise and treat suicidal patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Pam Ramsden has completed her PhD in Counseling Psychology from an American Psychological Association approved program at the University of Kansas. She then completed an internship with the Veterans Administration in Tucson Arizona specialising in PTSD. She has worked in the area of trauma and PTSD as a Clinician and Educator for over 25 years. She is a Specialist in PTSD, trauma therapy, stress therapies and victimology.

Abstract:

Social media allows the general population to view videos and pictures with never before seen levels of devastation and destruction. Th e world has been bombarded with pictures of the aft ermath. Stretchers of wounded and possibly dying victims were on display as well as grief stricken relatives searching through the deceased for their loved ones. As a result of watching these events and feeling the anguish of those who are directly experiencing them does have an impact on our daily activities whilst they are being broadcast, it is believed that a proportion of the population may suffer longer lasting eff ects such as negative stress reactions, anxiety and in some cases post-traumatic stress disorders-PTSD. Studies have shown that vicarious trauma does happen to health professionals and is defined as the transfer of violent, traumatic experiences from client/patients to a person of a helping profession. Th e trauma does not occur directly but indirectly. Th e results of my research indicates that approximately 20% of the research participants across four clinical studies were signifi cantly aff ected by media events and these individuals scored high on clinical measures of PTSD even though none of the individuals had previous trauma and were not present at the traumatic events and had only watched them on social media. My research indicates that the general populations are being aff ected by the viewing of violent images on social media and are being aff ected by vicarious trauma. Acts of violence erode our sense of security and safety, random acts of violence can create intense feelings of anger, frustration, fear and helplessness. As a result of watching these events, a certain percentage of individuals are experiencing lasting effects such as negative stress reactions, anxiety and in some cases post-traumatic stress disorders or vicarious PTSD. It is important that clinicians are aware and provide additional support and guidance in the community in times of extreme violence and terroristic acts.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 15:30-15:45 @ Foyer