Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Depression, Anxiety and Stress Management London, UK.

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Day 1 :

Stress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker David Truswell photo
Biography:

David Truswell has worked in the Community-based Mental Health Services in the UK for over 30 years developing services for people with complex care needs and enduring mental health problems. From 2009-2011, he was the Dementia Implementation Lead for Commissioning Support for London, working with commissioners across London to improve dementia services. He is the Chair of the Dementia Alliance for Culture and Ethnicity, a grassroots alliance of dementia organisations. He recently left the NHS to set up some fresh thinking, an independent health sector change management consultancy.

Abstract:

While there is growing research on severe mental health issues such as psychosis and suicide amongst Black, Asia and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, less attention is paid to the wider range of mental health issues for these communities such as depression, anxiety and stress. Often people can try to manage these issues through self-medicating (alcohol or other substance abuse) or access to non-statutory services (including religious ministry) rather than visiting a GP. In the aftermath of the UK referendum to leave the European Union some have argued that mainstream media narratives have shifted towards ‘normalising’ rhetoric about immigration that would have previously been regarded as unacceptably racist. While there is some evidence that across the UK racist physical assaults and harassment have increased there has been no exploration of the mental health impact of this narrative shift. This presentation explores the impact of ‘everyday racism’ as a cause of depression, anxiety and stress, the interaction with existing stigma towards mental illness in BAME communities and considers the potential consequences for those struggling with these issues to gain access to appropriate help. Recent experience working to improve access to support services for people BAME communities with OCD and for BAME ex-offenders with mental health problems will be used as an illustration of some the challenges.

Stress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Torao Ishida photo
Biography:

Torao Ishida has completed his PhD from Tokyo University and Post-doctoral studies from Princeton University. He is Honorary Professor and Executive Director of Suzuka University of Medical Science and Honorary Researcher of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. He has published more than 160 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of the Japanese Society of Medicinal Dietetics. He has won ten awards in Japan, China, Korea and USA including the Minister of ECSST Commendation Prize of Science and Technology and Tokyo metropolitan Merit Award of Science and Technology

Abstract:

We developed mild depression in mice and rats by water-immersion stress. We treated these mildly depressed mice and rats with acupuncture on the GV20 and Ex-HN3 points with imipramine. We measured the immobile time and serum corticosterone level in the mice and rats and mRNA expressions of NT-3, NT-4/5, and TNF-alpha in the mice. The simultaneous acupuncture treatment on GV20 and Ex-HN4 of the mice and rats significantly reduced immobility time in forced swimming test as well as imipramine treatment. This treatment enhanced mRNA expressions of NT-3 and NT-4/5 but decreased TNF-alpha mRNA expression of the mice. Single acupuncture treatment on either GV 20 or Ex-HN 4 did not reduce immobile time. We treated 10 healthy persons with electro acupuncture (EA) on the above two points. Changes in integral value of blood oxygenation level of cerebral cortex during verbal fluency task before and after EA were measured with NIRS, which is auxiliary method of evaluation of depression. There was not statistically significant difference between two means of integral values before and after EA treatment with conventional statistical analysis. We analyzed the above effects of EA with using Ishida’s response formula (Y=AX+B, where [Y] is increase value after treatment, [A] is the slope value, [X] is the value before treatment [B] is Y-intercept value). We found that [Y] increased reverse dependently on [X] when [X] was smaller than [−B/A] and decreased dependently on [X] when [X] was larger than [−B/A]. These increase and decrease of the value were almost canceled each other during calculation of mean but not canceled during calculation of its standard error. Conventional statistical analysis was not consistent with the actual effect of acupuncture having homeostatic effects. We developed new statistical analysis suitable for homeostatic effects.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break: 11:00-11:15 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

Tores Theorell

Stockholm University, Sweden

Keynote: Cultural activities in the work place
Stress 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tores Theorell photo
Biography:

Tores Theorell is an emeritus Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Karolinska Institute. He is a Physician and defended his dissertation in 1971 at the Karolinska Institute with his thesis on “Life events in relation to myocardial infarction”. He has done his practice in Clinical Internal Medicine and Cardiology from 1967-1978 and Social Medicine from 1978-1980. He was a Professor at the National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health in 1981.

Abstract:

There is growing evidence indicating that cultural activities (writing, music, visual arts, dancing and theatre) can be used in public health work. Singing in a choir may for instance provide meaning in life, physical exercise, short-term kicks of wellbeing hormones, social bonding and improved breathing. Furthermore in our research cultural activities are significantly associated with good handling of emotions which is central in social functioning in the modern worksite. What relevance does such knowledge have for modern working life? Findings were based upon a two-year follow-up study of 6000 Swedish working men and women. Emotional exhaustion and working conditions including cultural activities at work were recorded at start. With adjustment for confounders (age, gender, demand and decision authority at work, non-listening manager and education) a statistically significant “protective effect” of cultural activities against emotional exhaustion was shown. Accordingly there is reason to test cultural programs in worksites. A thorough discussion regarding individual needs, ethical aspects and practical handling is needed. Diversity is central practical experiments in worksites have indicated that jealousy and unwanted effects among non-participants in programs could arise. Several kinds of cultural activities should therefore be available. If handled wisely, cultural activities could increase cohesiveness and creativity in work sites.
  

  • Workshop
Location: Waterfront 3

Session Introduction

David Muss

BMI Hospital, UK

Title: The International Association for Rewind Trauma Therapy
Speaker
Biography:

David Muss has done his Medical Training in Italy in the year 1968 and obtained his Medical Degree in 1977. He is the Director of the BMI PTSD Unit since 1989. He has published a new technique for treating PTSD in 1991 i.e., Rewind Technique for PTSD and founded the International Association for Rewind Therapy. He has contributed to various books, published the fi rst PTSD self-help book in the UK and has many papers published in peer reviewed journal.

Abstract:

PTSD therapy: Currently in the UK NICE guidelines approve two CBT therapies, TFCBT and EMDR. Both are considered variations of cognitive therapy can involve up to twenty sessions and carry a success rate around 40%. Th e rewind technique, in clinical use since 1991, contrary to the above, provides rapid, eff ective (95% success rate), enduring closure rather than coping mechanisms or so called signifi cant improvement in just two to three sessions. Furthermore, it is the only treatment shown to be eff ective for group therapy of any size and greatly minimizes the risk of compassion fatigue. Th e workshop will identify those traumatized directly and those traumatized indirectly. Everyone willing to experience the treatment will be treated, prior to completing the IES. At the end of the workshop the rewind manual, IES, and role play reminder will be provided.

Speaker
Biography:

Arthur G O’Malley has worked as a Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist since 2004 and currently is an EMDR Consultant from 2008 to 2018. He is a member of the UK and Ireland EMDR Association since 2002 and was a member of the European Conference Organizing Committee for the London Conference and the Child and Adolescent Committee. He has given presentations at their AGMs in Glasgow, Manchester and Dublin. Currently, he is working in the fields of trauma, neglect and the developing brain, attachment disorders, personality disorders, emotional dysregulation in ADHD and ASD diagnosis and management. He has written articles on clinical effectiveness of BART psychotherapy, and is the author of a book “The art of BART”.

Abstract:

This is an integrated approach to psychotherapy, which incorporates elements of trauma focused cognitive behavior therapy (TF-CBT), eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), mindfulness, somatic experiencing and sensorimotor psychotherapy (SP). Th is workshop gives participants an understanding of information processing in the body following signifi cant life events. Gut feelings are initially registered at the level of the gut brain. Research on the gut microbiome and its relation to mental health will be presented. Th e next level of reprocessing takes place at the level of the heart brain, which is often linked to feelings of loss, panic and anxiety. Activation of the body’s energy system continues with activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. A key component of reprocessing is overcoming the symptoms of speechless terror, which are felt at the level of throat and pharynx. Th e goal of activating and reprocessing these sensations motor impulses feelings and thoughts is to bring unconscious triggers into conscious awareness. In trauma, the body keeps the score with 90% of information while we are consciously aware of only 10%. Th e reprocessing is continued with the patient being maintained in calm WATERS (window of aff ective tolerance emotional regulation and stability). Th e author will explain his two and three-dimensional models of high arousal RAPIDS (racing thoughts, aff ective instability, partitioned personality, impulsivity, dissociation and suicidality). Th is will also include a demonstration of low arousal states or FROZEN (freeze reaction, oblivious, zonked out and emotionally numb). I will illustrate the use of the BART psychotherapy with diff erent types of traumatic dissociation with reference to individual cases of both acute and complex PTSD.

  • Stress | Stress Therapies | Trauma | Depression| Work Stress
Location: Waterfront 3
Speaker

Chair

David Truswell

Somefreshthinking Consultancy, UK

Speaker

Co-Chair

Tores Theorell

Stockholm University, Sweden

Session Introduction

Denny Meyer

Swinburne University of Technology, Australia

Title: Coping with Stress: Insights from an Online Mental Health Platform
Speaker
Biography:

Denny Meyer is a Professor in the School of Health Sciences at the Swinburne University of Technology. She is an Applied Statistician specialized in the area of Mental Health Research. Her areas of particular interest include suicide ideation, vision loss, stress and the analysis of data collected using online systems with high attrition rates. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has worked with research teams on numerous research grants and tenders.

Abstract:

Anxiety online was a very successful online platform, created with assistance from the Australian Department of Health and Ageing. Th is platform was designed to diagnose twenty-one mental health disorders and to provide online treatment for five anxiety disorders. In addition, this platform has provided a database consisting of very valuable mental health data. This database has been used to validate several mental health diagnoses provided by the platform, to investigate the factors associated with attrition and to study the comorbidity patterns found in this online sample. More recently this database has been used to build a model to predict the risk of suicide ideation and to produce a personalized study of the stress management strategies of people accessing this system. In particular, using a segmentation analysis and appropriate models, it has been shown that that there are strong links between certain combinations of coping strategies for stress and suicide ideation. The results confirm that more coping strategies are often used when distress or the number of mental health disorders is higher. In this address we describe some of the advantages of an online database of this nature, such as its ability to reach patients who do not seek other forms of mental health assistance and the relatively low cost of data collection. In addition we dwell on some of the disadvantages of such a database, such as the low rate of post-treatment assessment and biases in the sample in terms of age, gender and computer literacy.

Speaker
Biography:

Wayne Grant Carter completed a BSc (Hons) degree in Biochemistry with Nutrition and then a PhD in Biochemistry at the University of Southampton. He subsequently undertook post-doctoral research posts at The Babraham Institute, Cambridge; Imperial College, London; University of California at Irvine, USA, and the University of Oxford. Additionally, he has worked for a global reagent supplier, Sigma, a SME company, Mobious Genomics, and has been employed as a consultant for Syngenta. He is currently a Lecturer and research Group Leader within the School of Medicine, University of Nottingham. His research interests are varied and include detection and utilisation of novel biomarkers of toxicological exposure. He currently serves on the Editorial Board of over 40 different medicallyrelated journals and reviews for over 50 more.

Abstract:

The brain is a target of physiological stress, and is infl uenced and responds to stress-induced adaptation via synaptic plasticity. This brain structural remodelling can infl uence an individual’s behaviour and physiological responses. Dysregulation of stress may contribute to the development of a number of psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD). The management of stress typically involves pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. For the former, drug or herb therapy has been employed, but stressed individuals may also adopt acute (binge) and/or repetitive alcohol drinking behaviour. Excessive alcohol intake also drives neurobiological changes, some of which may contribute to the development of MDD. Alcohol dependency and MDD have alarmingly high rates of co-morbidity, indicative of a commonality of molecular mechanisms. In this talk I will highlight some of the neurobiological changes associated with stress, alcoholism and consider alcoholism and depression co-morbidity.

Break: Lunch Break: 13:45-14:30 @ Restaurant
Speaker
Biography:

Deen Mirza is a General Practitioner in South London. He qualifi ed from Imperial College School of Medicine in the year 2000 and was trained to become a GP in the Croydon VTS. He has done DGM, the DCH, the DTMH and a Post-graduate certifi cate in Healthcare Education. He has held academic GP posts at several universities. He currently works as a Clinician and Educator at AT Medics, London, UK.

Abstract:

General practitioners are a high achieving section of the population with perfectionist tendencies. Under the strain of increased work pressure, some experience professional burnout. Identifying contributory factors common to GPs who have suffered burnout may help to predict and intervene with those at risk of burnout. Five UK family doctors who have suffered burnout personally were interviewed to explore the context of their burnout experience. The interviews were analyzed qualitatively to identify common themes. Personality traits, risk tolerance threshold and situational pressure appear as prominent commonalities for these GPs as potential causes for burnout. Awareness of these characteristics may help to identify those GPs prone to burnout. Further research is required to clarify what interventions are of proven benefit t in such cases.

Speaker
Biography:

Marina Ziff holds a degree in International Relations and a MA in Health and Social Marketing. She has previously worked at MIND (Mental Health Charity) and the NHS. Currently, she is completing her fi nal year of Gestalt Counseling Diploma at the Albany Centre in Hertfordshire and is a student of Shamanism at the Mystery School of Amaru. She has a special interest in helping individuals fi nd a deeper meaning in their life through igniting their soul’s spiritual purpose.

Abstract:

Research suggests that people in emerging nations are more stressed than those in the developed world, yet there is a signifi cant rise of stress related mental health issues in developed countries like the UK. Some of the most stressed people in our society are those who are prohibited from being in such a state. They are the type of people that as a society we struggle to have compassion for and who are likely to have had a privileged upbringing that most people can only dream of, yet they too experience stress and related emotional health issues. Why is their stress ‘forbidden’? It is because sections of our society are not allowed to admit that they are unhappy because they have money and money is supposed to be the answer to everything. Our society is built on this concept and it’s called, capitalism and consumerism. Why is their stress hidden? It’s hidden because as a society we are not interested, we may struggle to feel sympathy and compassion for those people who on paper seem to have it all but these people are not allowed to admit the truth, even to themselves, that there is something more beyond the material world. Th ey represent the pinnacle of ultimate happiness and the solution to our entire mortal woos so what on earth have they got to be stressed and unhappy about? You may ask why it calls for a spiritual solution, it calls for a spiritual solution because until you have meaning and purpose in your life, you’ll never truly feel alive or happy and money cannot acquire it.

Speaker
Biography:

Saddiga Al-Ghalib is an Assistant Professor, Psychology Department, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She is the Chair of the Psychology Department, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She has done her PhD (Educational Psychology) from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 2004. She has done her MS (Educational Psychology) from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She has done her BS (Curriculum and Instruction) also from Southern Illinois University Carbondale, in 1991. She was the First Director to the Center of Excellence in Teaching and Learning, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, in 2007 and also the First Director to the Research and Consultancy Institute, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She was the Dean of Graduate Studies and Scientifi c Research, Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2009-2013.

Abstract:

The aim of this research is to look into the prevalence rates and determine which gender has higher depression, anxiety and stress among university students of both genders in Jeddah, and to determine the relationship among depression, anxiety and stress. Random stratifi ed sampling was used and a sample from all private and public universities in Jeddah was selected. Th e Arabic and English version of depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS21) was used. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (2016), people always face life stressors and go through hard situations that make them feel anxious, stressed or even depressed, but it is normal to express the right emotions at the right time. But some people have anxiety or/and depression which makes them experience those emotions continuously at all times, and make it a very difficult for them to function normally and make them struggle in practising their daily activities. Mental illness, in general, is becoming a global problem, and the numbers reaching crisis level, that is why this problem requires proper intervention and management (Almutairi, 2015), so shedding light to the prevalence rates of depression, anxiety and stress among university students is very important because when people have a prove of their problem then they will seek help. Therefore, this current research will benefit  the society because by understanding the phenomena it would help the individuals in controlling it before it gets out of control and learn how to cope with it positively and hopefully reduce the prevalence of those conditions.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break: 16:00-16:15 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Jacqueline A Hinds is a certifi ed Emotional Intelligence Coach (CEIC) and Leadership Consultant and, has worked in the healthcare sector for over 30 years. From 2006-2010, she has worked as a Leadership Development Consultant at the Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (10,000 staff) and, from 2010-2015 as Education Academy Training Manager of Barts Health NHS Trust (15,000 staff). Currently, she is the Chair of SoEI, UK.

Abstract:

Leading transformation in health care has a tremendous advantage in improving the services, patient experience and care within the National Health Service (NHS). It also bears the scars and, has had a significant impact on staff undergoing the transformation and, in a large majority of cases, impairing their duty of care to the patients and services under their care. The concept of emotional intelligence (EI) in healthcare, although not referred to or identified as an integral part of the healthcare infrastructure, is in reality interwoven into everything that is delivered as part of a service provider. In fact, EI is crucial throughout all levels of employees within healthcare and not just senior managers or leaders; the knowledge of EI enables individuals to understand their emotions, emotional meanings and to, reflectively regulate these emotions whilst transitioning through change initiatives and periods of significant and, sometimes, rapid transformation. Not all healthcare transformational projects have been successful in the past, some have been more transactional and result driven, which has led to employees feeling pressured and disturbed about the changes that were taking place and, more often than not, being emotionally unstable or stressed as a result of the changes at that juncture. Experiences ineffective transformational change and, the fallout of transactional change initiatives, has resulted over the years in a significant rise in organisations requesting external consultants to deliver stress management, conflict resolution and more recently, anger management training within their establishments. The presentation will highlight some examples of where Emotional Intelligence has made a significant contribution to leading smoother transformation initiatives within the healthcare.
 

Andrew Firestone

Psychiatrists in private practice, Australia

Title: Stress at work: Psychodynamics in asymmetrical work relationships
Speaker
Biography:

Andrew Firestone (MRCPsych, FRANZCP) is a Family Therapist and doing his private practice in Melbourne. He has interest in Cultural Psychiatry.

Abstract:

In this presentation, two Psychiatrists with extensive experience in psychiatric workplace casualties offer an examination of stress symptoms in the context of asymmetrical work relationship stress. Helpful psychodynamic principles are discussed, and the clinical equation of panic attack=suppressed forbidden rage is suggested as a valuable pointer in clinical cases of work stress. Anxiety is only one of several responses to trauma. A case series of panic attacks in 33 patients is presented to confirm the high incidence of comorbidity of panic disorder with the depressive spectrum. It is suggested that chronic disability may be prevented by open acknowledgement of irreconcilable asymmetrical relationships, as occurs in marital therapy and in the DSM system a new V-Code “irreconcilable work diffi culties with a superior” should be added.